Tonalism Still Life

Enyaw

namuh
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Tonalism.jpg

11 x 14 inches .. oil on Paper .. alla prima .. painted Jan 14/24
Tonalism .. after Terri asked if I was in knowledge of American Tonalism, and I wasn't, I decided to take a tour. I found a good site with great explanations of how they put warm over cold to get the vibration. Well, that's what I got out of it anyway. Watched 350 pictures of paintings by George Inness and four or five still life artists in the vein of tonalism. Wish I had marked the site as they quoted Henry David Thoreau often and he was such a good writer. Brought back memories of my reading of his book "On Walden Pond". Anyway, here is my attempt at a tonalist still life.
 
I understand, I think, what you said, but I'm not getting much 'warm' from this work at all.

Maybe I'm just not looking at it right, but even your yellows and that pinkened background on the right are, to me, so greyed they appear cool rather than warm. The table top is about the warmest area- it even hops forward a bit.

However, I really like the composition, and you've got an attention to detail going on that keeps the eye in. The chair is a terrific foil to the scene. I like the piece whether it followed some scheme or not.
 
Thank you JStar.
Well, I’m not sure I understood it all anyway. I ran in with blackish greens and the went over with purple reds and blues and the table ended up a greenish yellow with red over and through it. It’s wonky because I took a picture and forgot to correct the photo discrepancies. The angle I was on drew it toward me. The flowers were a combo of warm and cool yellow. I saw it in the end but decided to leave it alone as I liked the end result.
 
I'm a fan of Tonalism and George Inness in particular so this one really does it for me, Wayne. I didn't know about the warm over cool thing but it provides an extra layer of interest. To me, it's all about subtle light effects and less about colors anyways, more about the mood than anything else. I like the curves of the chair, vase and table against the rectangular shape of the window and the overall feeling of quiet simplicity. It deserves a frame!
 
Well! I shouldn't be surprised that you tackled this style. I've never heard about the warm over cool process either, mainly palette selection and mood. But this turned out beautifully! 👏

Definitely a moody piece. For a first try of a new approach, it's amazing how you nailed it! ❤️
 
Watched 350 pictures of paintings by George Inness and four or five still life artists in the vein of tonalism.
George Inness is great. Did you know that James Whistler is also considered, among other things, a Tonalism artist? His famous portrait of his mother has a very distinctive Tonalism palette (and in fact, is actually called "Arrangement in Grey and Black No. 1," very technical, and later best known as "Whistler's Mother."

I can also suggest looking at some of Charles Warren Eaton's work, though he followed a darker palette in many instances. I love it! Gorgeous work.
 
Thank you JStar.
Well, I’m not sure I understood it all anyway. I ran in with blackish greens and the went over with purple reds and blues and the table ended up a greenish yellow with red over and through it. It’s wonky because I took a picture and forgot to correct the photo discrepancies. The angle I was on drew it toward me. The flowers were a combo of warm and cool yellow. I saw it in the end but decided to leave it alone as I liked the end result.
One of the colour ideas I teach is that warm/cool tones are not so much about sides of the wheel or yellows-reds are warm/blues and greens cool, as that the higher the chroma- the purity- of a hue, the warmer it is and so it will come forward, and the more the hue is greyed, will cool it, and it will recede.

But, honestly, you're a better artist than I to attempt this kind of idea..
 
Thank you Donna. When it dries it will make my living room wall where I frame them and then study them to pieces.

Thanks Terry. Yes Whirler was aside Innes in the document as leaders in the movement. thanks for the new na,es as I like looking at other artist’s work for ideas. I have to see Inness again as there were a couple of pieces that spoke to me. Had a quick glance at Charles‘s works and his dark work is rather dark but he has some really good winter works. So soft and no hint of strong sunlight, just sullen peaceful days.

Thank you JStar. I think as artists we all have our own concept of hues and color regression or advancement. I don’t really pay mind to all as certain things attract my attention and then of course my idea of how to apply things is my interpretation. I would not say better but I do like to try things. Sometimes they work.
 
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Thank you. I must say I have been using strong light for some time but I am becoming a fan of subdued lighting and subtle hue movements.
 
My understanding of "Tonalism" was that it employed an overall dominant "tone". You didn't get big contrasts of either value or color. Also, the Tonalist paintings tend to avoid hard edges or lines. Whistler definitely was a tonalist at times.

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Rembrandt and Velazquez are precursors to the Tonalists.

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Gauguin would be the "anti-Tonalist". 😜 :LOL:

While I quite admire the Tonalists (as well as Rembrandt and Velazquez) I personally lean toward clarity of line and saturated color... the Renaissance, Ingres, Rubens, Matisse, Bonnard, Gauguin...
 
Interesting. I can'f find the articile I read but I probably read it wrong in my hasty way of reading. I can see why you like what you like by looking at your art. I don't like the dark dark tonalism but the artists seem to have some milder works in the middle that are quite subtle to gaze on. I took a liking to the Russian Impressionist and the insuination of things through rough shapes and values.
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I agree with Joe, beautiful work, regardless of the method employed. And a very interesting discussion. I’ve always liked using a color’s complementary to gray it.
 
Thanks Sno .. I use both .. black and compliment. I use black if I make a neutral grey and then when I have the neurtral grey I tint the grey with the compliments so I arrive somewhat differently at times but I don't think it makes a big difference. As well, when I say over I don't mean cover it completely. I sort of like to do it as if the panel were prepainted with a color and allow that color to have it's places in the cracks and edges and holes so it's always there. If that makes any sense I'd be surprised but that's what I do. As well though, black makes a great take down in blue and red.

Thankyou Sandlynn and Bartc
 
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