Rustoleum Auto Primer

Bongo

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Steve Baumann, who is a big cheese painter/instructor on YouTube - recommends that instead of using gesso to prime a panel, spray it with Rustoleum Auto Primer. He says it's fast, easy, cheap and makes for a fantastic surface to paint on.

Has anyone used this or know anything about it?

Next time I get to the hardware store I'm going to pick up a can and try it out.
 
Steve Baumann, who is a big cheese painter/instructor on YouTube - recommends that instead of using gesso to prime a panel, spray it with Rustoleum Auto Primer. He says it's fast, easy, cheap and makes for a fantastic surface to paint on.

Has anyone used this or know anything about it?

Next time I get to the hardware store I'm going to pick up a can and try it out.
Hey Bongo
I used it on auto bodies long time ago, and it really has a good tooth. I wondered about using it on wood, hardboard or paper, but it has a pretty strong solvent smell as I remember and I thought that the solvent might do bad things to those supports. Glad to know about the recommendation - Thanks.
 
Yes you would definitely want to spray outside. Stephan Baumann is the real deal so if he's recommending it highly I think it's worth a try. I'm going to Home Depot tomorrow anyway so I'll pick up a can. Here is the part (I hope I got it) where he talks about it. It is just an aside as he's lecturing about something else. You can learn more from his off-the-cuff and asides than the actual lecture sometimes.
starts talking about it around here
 
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That's interesting. It does have a nice matte finish with the tiniest bit of nap to it, which I guess is the same toothiness Trier mentioned. I like ratty old trucks and motorcycles and have always liked the texture and look of the gray and the red primer. I have no idea if it is compatible/archival with artists materials, or how conservators might feel about it a hundred years from now when "That Day at the Park" is hanging in a museum :)

I have been seduced by Zinnser B-I-N for spray priming hardboard. It's kind of slick it you use it correctly, but varying degrees of texture can be had by spraying it from too far away and you can always sand it if it's too slick. I seriously doubt that that stuff would ever let go of a wood surface or let any staining substance discolor from below, but, then, I have never sold a painting and I don't care if one does delaminate or whatever 30 years from now. My disclaimer would be that I have only used it to goof around with my paints on cardboard and hardboard.
 
Please keep us posted on this Bongo. I would like to know about this. And I wonder if it would seal the wood, or if it's something to be sprayed over the sealer. I would think the latter. Maybe I'd have to ask someone knowledgeable at Home Depot.
 
And he also recommend not to avoide using A crimson bcz it isnt paint. glad im using Q magenta. :)
he have lots of good tips in his studio films on youtube.
 
All of these are available in cans for brushing, so you don't have to use an aerosol and gas yourself. Brushing in also gives a thicker stronger bond than spraying, so "they" say. JMHO Rustoleum is oil-based, cleans up with mineral spirits; Zinsser BIN is white-pigmented shellac, cleans up with denatured alcohol; Kilz 2 is a white water-based indoor/outdoor primer, cleans with water (I like to use this, no problems yet. It has the least odor problem). As an old do-it-yourselfer, I've used all of these for one project or another, they're used by commercial painters for adhesion to all kinds of surfaces. Kilz is the only one I've used on canvas. Like "they" say, if the Old Masters had Rustoleum, theyda used it.
 
And he also recommend not to avoide using A crimson bcz it isnt paint. glad im using Q magenta. :)
he have lots of good tips in his studio films on youtube.
I don't understand what you're saying about alizarin crimson. Can you give me the time position in the video where he says it isn't paint?
 
All of these are available in cans for brushing, so you don't have to use an aerosol and gas yourself. Brushing in also gives a thicker stronger bond than spraying, so "they" say.
That's good to know. I like the dimpled texture of B-I-N that spraying can create, but maybe I'll get a small can for brushing on too. It's good that you mentioned the ingredients too: yeah, I think it's basically titanium white and dissolved shellac.
Dare I go to BigBoxHardware on this day of orgiastic shopping in the US of A?
 
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I don't understand what you're saying about alizarin crimson. Can you give me the time position in the video where he says it isn't paint?
Baumann have more than hunderds film. which one should i pick to search for it?:ROFLMAO:
 
So, what are the advantages of this alternative to acrylic gesso (I assume you aren't speaking of the real thing)?
 
I must be very dense, because I just don't understand you. Let's just leave it there.
He still believes it to be true, since he hasn't retracted it from his video or explained it further in the time since Lazurus pointed it out?
 
So, what are the advantages of this alternative to acrylic gesso (I assume you aren't speaking of the real thing)?
One thing (for me, anyway) is easy access to the alternatives; I can walk to the hardware store, but I rarely get to go to the art supply store. And laziness, since i don't have to clean a brush. And I like the surface my preferred alternative leaves. I don't know about a cost comparison, though, but I imagine the alternatives might win over the expensive alkyd art primer I use for oils and alkyds.
 
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