Not sure where to post my questions.

JennieJo

Experimentalist
Messages
936
Hoping this a good place to start.
Background, I'm totally self-taught in oil painting. The one this I have trouble having confidence in my knowledge is: finishings. I have read a lot, but all my tests have been unsatisfactory: too glossy, too uneven, ...

I want to get a good finish on this work, oil paint
on canvas. Created over many years, lots of editing and some major focus changes.

Any hints, products, process links etc will be gratefully received

Extra info: it's a tribute to my dad. His life in review.

1000002821-04.jpeg
1000002820-02.jpeg
1000002821-03.jpeg
 
It's a great painting. I'm not sure what exactly you're looking for in terms of advice. It doesn't look too glossy or uneven to me, according to these pictures.
 
Love this, Jennie - beautiful results! Of course as Ayin says, we're only looking at your photos so some of what's concerning you may not be visible.

The textures look gorgeous. When you write "too uneven" are you referring to your application of your oil paints? The colors look rich and beautiful and I can't detect thin areas, just nice brush strokes.

As to glossy, I don't know. Oil pastels are the closest thing I've used and I can comment that the oil content can vary widely between manufacturers (along with pigment, wax, etc), so could that be part of what you're noticing?

Aside from that, I got nothing! Hopefully another user in the medium will weigh in.

To repeat, the photos here show a rich and beautiful painting. ❤️ I love it!
 
You can contain gloss by adding matte varnish to gloss varnish. Find the right mixture and apply your varnish. As well, you could use beeswax to polish your painting but too much polish will result in a matte finish. You have to get the right mixture. If you can live with a matte varnish then use beeswax to polish your painting Or a matte varnish. If you want a semigloss, you need to find the right mixture of matte and gloss or the right amount of rub with beeswax.
 
It's a great painting. I'm not sure what exactly you're looking for in terms of advice. It doesn't look too glossy or uneven to me, according to these pictures.
Thanks. I tried to get the texture as close to reality as I could. I am quite insecure when it comes to textures. Mine never seem right.
It's a great painting. I'm not sure what exactly you're looking for in terms of advice. It doesn't look too glossy or uneven to me, according to these pictures.

Love this, Jennie - beautiful results! Of course as Ayin says, we're only looking at your photos so some of what's concerning you may not be visible.

The textures look gorgeous. When you write "too uneven" are you referring to your application of your oil paints? The colors look rich and beautiful and I can't detect thin areas, just nice brush strokes.

As to glossy, I don't know. Oil pastels are the closest thing I've used and I can comment that the oil content can vary widely between manufacturers (along with pigment, wax, etc), so could that be part of what you're noticing?

Aside from that, I got nothing! Hopefully another user in the medium will weigh in.

To repeat, the photos here show a rich and beautiful painting. ❤️ I love it!
Thanks Terri. It is the application of the paint, I think! I do so many layers, sometimes, I'm not sure if I should go for a smoother look as I layer. I started this one 4 years ago as an acrylic. Content and composition haven't changed, just the detail and colour selection.
 
You can contain gloss by adding matte varnish to gloss varnish. Find the right mixture and apply your varnish. As well, you could use beeswax to polish your painting but too much polish will result in a matte finish. You have to get the right mixture. If you can live with a matte varnish then use beeswax to polish your painting Or a matte varnish. If you want a semigloss, you need to find the right mixture of matte and gloss or the right amount of rub with beeswax.
Thanks. I hadn't thought of mixing varnishes. And, was going to try polish, until I read a post on a respected site that said you can't let beeswaxed works get too as the wax melts. That counted me out immediately. When my local art supply sho didn't have any. Always meant to, but didn't, follow up when I got to a big smoke.
 
You are not supposed to leave an oil painting in the sun or direct heat so wax is not a problem unless you get careless. That said, wax leaves a softness and is easily scratched. That is not a problem for someone who uses wax as they can buff it out with a little more wax but for a customer it would be something they should be warned about. They would not have the knowledge to handle the situtation.
 
You are not supposed to leave an oil painting in the sun or direct heat so wax is not a problem unless you get careless. That said, wax leaves a softness and is easily scratched. That is not a problem for someone who uses wax as they can buff it out with a little more wax but for a customer it would be something they should be warned about. They would not have the knowledge to handle the situtation.
I got the impression that it was ambient not only direct heat that was an issue. That makes more sense, my work spaces are cool but not air-conditioned. Was concerned about the heat if the area was closed up over the summer when temps are regularly over 90 degrees.
 
Hi Jenny. Really interesting work, the colours are great. I can't see the surface on your work. I don't have heaps of experience in oils and use them only periodically. When I do it is thin glazes. There are times when the surface is more Matt where I haven't worked it....
I did find that a mixture of varnish like Wayne suggests works to even out things. Test on an old work!!! I did find a guide, will try to find it again...
 
Back
Top