How did you learn art?

Maybenartist

Well-known member
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471
I think like St Luke's I would chosen to learn in different Ateliers, especially the ones I've looked at in Florence. Better than trial and error because whatever I learn by that method, someone has learned before and can teach it to me.
 

WFMartin

Well-known member
Messages
177
A good friend said...' You ain't a painter, but you tell a good story.'

Hmmm....Not sure to whom that comment is directed...?

I think like St Luke's I would chosen to learn in different Ateliers, especially the ones I've looked at in Florence. Better than trial and error because whatever I learn by that method, someone has learned before and can teach it to me.

I agree with that. In my opinion, "learning to oil paint" is about 90% knowledge, and only about 10% actual, operational techniques. Such useful "knowledge" is very teachable by those who have already gained it, and very learnable by those who are willing to do so.
 
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Dave Woody

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10B76A36-590D-4989-BB0A-C9A3D7C5F245.jpeg
 

Iain

2 eyes.
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2,094
I have no idea. But it is certainly marketing. Can we please have it removed! Shameless.
 

Triumph

Member
Messages
29
I grew up in artistic family. My dad went to Cooper Union and had many friends who also did. I had a strong interest in birds, and began doing pencil sketches of them when I was thirteen, especially of raptors. My dad taught me the basics of pencil work and I took it from there.
In high school I had a very progressive art teacher so I wasn't limited to doing realistic work. Ab-Ex was very big at the time so I was able to experiment with that.

Since I grew up just a stone's throw from New York I went to many museums, often in my dad's company. He explained a lot of stuff to me, having a good background in art history.

I ended up at Cooper myself but didn't stay long. The corner of St Mark's Place and Bowery was not exactly a great place to try to go to school in 1967. What was going on in the street was far more interesting. l had begun playing guitar when I was sixteen and decided a few years later that I wanted to learn to build them, which I did. Hardly anyone was doing this at the time, so it took me four years to acquire enough knowledge to build my first. I stopped building in 1986 to devote myself more to playing.

From then on it was all guitar all the time until 1996, when by kismet I met my first teacher in bird carving, Floyd Scholz, who was about to open a school. Though I had no special interest in this art form, I decided to take a seminar there, enjoyed it, and kept at it from then on until I was stricken with rheumatoid arthritis in 2005.
Floyd Scholz, master carver- viewed his work in Bennington(VT) Center for the Arts, unfortunately now closed for good. Astounding detail in his birds including a portion of the natural surroundings.
 
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