Coarse pumice gel with OP's...an experiment

Terri

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This is one I did last year, more about process than painting. I did a lot wrong with this one, but the end result was still fun playtime. I came across a reference to using textured gels and other mediums with OP's and I hadn't tried it yet. Whew!


Barnyard graphite sketch.jpg


The first thing I did wrong was reach for Arches OIL paper, when I knew I was going to be using water on this gel. :rolleyes: It buckled of course, and we had to fight about it. After letting it dry overnight, it had smoothed back enough where I could continue.

Barnyard wip 3.jpg


Scumbled in the OP's all over the dry pumice. The pumice was very durable, didn't chip off, basically just ate up the OP's. I was using my cheaper, hard Cray-Pas Expressionist for this step. I could have gone with even cheaper OP's, since naturally the pumice ate everything.

To blend the OP's into the pumice, I used Turpenoid with a stiffer brush. The oil paper does fine with Turpenoid, as opposed to water, so everything spread nicely. I wasn't sure how the pumice would accepted the Turpenoid, but it was fine.


Barnyard wip 4.jpg


I got lots of rough, bumpy texture, which was great for this barnyard scene. I left it all pretty loose, in a folk art kind of way, which is different than what I usually do.

Barnyard final.jpg



It was fun! I'll try it again, maybe go for a beach, or other sandy scene. All comments welcomed and appreciated. Thanks for looking!
 
How clever is that! Well done for trying out the process. I love the bright colours and the texture. It would suit a sandy very well.
 
What a fun process and you ended up with a nice painting, Terri! I use fine pumice gel and can tell from your photos that the coarse gel is much, much coarser. It's great how the Turpenoid gives you a nice even layer to paint on or you can choose to leave the first layers alone like you did for the far pen. I like the bright, upbeat feel to this charming farm scene!
 
Looks fun. look like the front anmles are in contact to conspirate on something while the back animles are fighting in the ring. nice work.
 
I actually really love how this turned out because it looks so folk arty! Do you think you will finish it despite the fact it didn't go the way you'd planned it? I really hope you do because the texture is so cool. ♥️ ♥️ ♥️
 
Thank you, Schuee, Donna, Lazarus and Arty! I've never been sure of this one and wondered if it's worth showing. I feel better about it!

I use fine pumice gel and can tell from your photos that the coarse gel is much, much coarser.
Yes, I wondered if fine pumice would have sufficed. This stuff was bumpy and a bit awkward to lay down. Once it dried it seemed okay, but it really gave me pause - especially when my paper buckled so badly as I slapped it on there. :LOL:

look like the front anmles are in contact to conspirate on something while the back animles are fighting in the ring. nice work.
That's funny!! :ROFLMAO: I never thought of it that way. Thank you for that!

Do you think you will finish it despite the fact it didn't go the way you'd planned it? I really hope you do because the texture is so cool.
I'm pretty much calling this one done, if only because the raised texture made it really hard to work around later. I wanted to give a few more details but things were skittling around it. So, I just called the game and kept everything loose. I think that's why it makes me unsure of it. I'm happy you like it!! ❤️
 
What an interesting process you went through. Thanks for sharing it. I can see it would be great for the right subject. A beach scene sounds like another scene that would be perfect for the technique. Since it eats oil pastels, I imagine it isn't a technique you would use often.

I chuckled at Lazarus' comment. He's right, the two animals in the ring do look as if they are facing off ready for a fight. :LOL:
 
Oh my, coarse pumice? I guess that did eat some OPs! The end result is super, though! Marc Chagall would love your rooster :)
 
That is very nice. The folk art element works perfectly. Great color. Next thing you know you'll be trading film for art supplies.
 
I love seeing someone else trying weird and wonderful oil pastel surface experiments! Yes, I've given the pumice gel a go - with... erm... interesting results! You managed to make something really fun out of it, and I love the Picasso bulls circling each other.

Thanks also for taking the time to give me so much extra info about oil pastels on another thread - I didn't want to derail from Nufocus's art with my grumbles about oil pastels, but it was much appreciated. It's great to see so much enthusiasm for oil pastels here!
 
I love the Picasso bulls circling each other.
You picked them off - bravo! Yes, I did go off on a little tangent in Nufocus's thread, since the opportunity was there. Hopefully I didn't derail it. ;) I agree, OP's don't get used as widely as other media, so it's hard to hold back when a discussion can be had.

I would love to see your results with pumice! We can cheer each other on.
 
I don't know much Picasso works. I thought they were cave etchings from earlier times.
 
I don't know much Picasso works. I thought they were cave etchings from earlier times.
He was said to have been inspired greatly by seeing them. Cave paintings, also African art, masks (see Les demoiselle d'Avignon, it seems obvious).

I love Western hieroglyphics, too. Simplicity of line. :)
 
People who aren't big fans of oil pastels (or Picasso) may not know the link, but Picasso supposedly wanted a new drawing tool that would allow him total artistic freedom, so Sennelier's oil pastels were created in response. There's a quote somewhere (possibly on a Sennelier box), that oil pastels 'express the true essence of the artist's gestures, in an uncompromised intensity of colour and texture'.

I love the idea. I also find oil pastels a really frustrating medium, so I love moaning about them, too.

I get sucked in to searching for the perfect surface - one that's rough, but not too rough, and slick, but not too slick - and then I remember that oil pastels were meant to be a route away from all the surface restrictions of oils (but I'd still really, really like to find a surface they work well on!).

Hope that signs me up as always being happy to chat oil pastels!
 
Hope that signs me up as always being happy to chat oil pastels!

Yes! Of course! Hooray! ❤

I'll chat about oil pastels anytime, too. I started with them mainly as another medium for hand painting silver gelatin prints. Did a few. Not wild about them that way, but they themselves were fun to handle. They smell good.

I realized they just made me happy, but I've never had a drawing class and put out a lot of junk. I feel somewhat improved over time, but always ready to learn more. Try to improve. Find a style. :)
 
I also find oil pastels a really frustrating medium, so I love moaning about them, too.
Sorry for the intrusion, but - "frustrating"- ain't that the truth! I haven't had mine out in a couple of years, but now I find them creeping back into my sketchbook :)
 
Sorry for the intrusion, but - "frustrating"- ain't that the truth! I haven't had mine out in a couple of years, but now I find them creeping back into my sketchbook :)
You're not intruding, Lamar! I think we can all feel that frustration with OP's at one time or another. I think I might be the poster child for OP frustration. :ROFLMAO:
 
They smell good.
That might be the most convincing reason I've heard to like them! (and it made me go and stick my nose into a box).

laika - Always happy to find someone who shares my frustration with oil pastels - I pack mine up quite often out of annoyance. Then I have to get them out again just for 'one' quick sketch... and so I go around again.
 
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