Tara and Jay (bromoil print)

Terri

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The photo was taken with my friends sitting back to back on the floor. The only light source was from a floor lamp, and I tilted the lamp shade to throw more light on them. (We were all a bit tipsy at the time, or I would likely have convinced myself that the lighting was never going to work!)

Inked by brush with black litho ink:


Tara and Jay resized.jpg



All comments welcomed and appreciated. Thanks for looking!
 
I really love this. I don't understand the process at all, but it doesn't stop me from appreciating the end result.
 
I realized that I had this process confused with carbon printing until you described the process so thoroughly in another of your bromoil posts. What a cool process! Can you make more than one pass with the original silver print?

I do think that the xerox lithography (or whatever it's called) is similar in a way to your bromoil prints, though not capable of as much tonal scale and detail. You've gotten me cranked on that again :unsure:.

Xerolithography article at alternativephotography.com.
 
I really love this. I don't understand the process at all, but it doesn't stop me from appreciating the end result.
That's how I feel when I look at some of your work, CaliAnn. :) Thank you for the kind words!


Lamar, thanks for the link! I love that site. :) Very interesting process and his stuff looks great. It's like inking a bromoil and doing a transfer at the same time, but if you don't have access to the printing press your results might not be as even. I'd try light pressure with a hard brayer rather than a spoon, but who knows.
Can you make more than one pass with the original silver print?
I'm not sure what you mean. :unsure: I'm sorry if I wasn't clear. Each silver gelatin print gets the bleach/tan bath in a tray, then it becomes a silver-free matrix and you let it dry flat, then apply the inks (brush or soft roller). I usually make a lot of prints while I'm in the darkroom so I can make a bunch of matrixes while I have the trays and chemistry set up. Matrixes can sit indefinitely until you feel like inking them.

But you do layer the ink, with either brush or the roller, definitely you can make more than one pass. Kind of like layering with other mediums, you and I have done oil pastel work and there's usually need to build layers there. You keep layering until you decide you like it, and you can dab on more (or remove some) after it's completely dried down (you soak the matrix so your paper is damp when you ink).
 
I'm not sure what you mean. :unsure:
Sorry! I was wondering if you could re-ink your original matrix, register it on the print somehow, then put it through the press again, say, to gain more density on the print, for instance. I think you answered that above, despite the vague wording of my question :)
It's like inking a bromoil and doing a transfer at the same time, but if you don't have access to the printing press your results might not be as even. I'd try light pressure with a hard brayer rather than a spoon, but who knows.
I thought the author's use of the word "transfer" was unfortunate; the only thing being transferred is ink/paint, just as in your bromoil prints. And I did use a hard brayer in the absence of a press for the only print of this kind that I've made (years ago). My print was a quick-and-dirty experiment, but it actually produced quite a decent print. Anyway, your bromoils have spurred me to resolve to make a new xerolithic print in the new year.

Happiest of New Years to thee and thine :)
 
Amazing work, Terri! Your process is beyond me but I appreciate the artistic results you get!
 
That is cool. Reminds me of the old technique of puttin a grease film around the outside ring of your lens filter to get a soft immersion on the photo. That was before computers took over. Never tried it but read of it one time.
 
Donna, Wayne - much thanks to you both! ❤️

I was wondering if you could re-ink your original matrix, register it on the print somehow, then put it through the press again, say, to gain more density on the print, for instance. I think you answered that above, despite the vague wording of my question
Ah, I get what you're asking now - no apology needed, I was being dense! YES - it is actually an additional process to over-ink a matrix for the sole purpose of putting it through a press to get a transfer. I don't have a press and have never done it.

You don't need a press to just apply ink to a single matrix: use either various brushes or roll the ink on with a soft roller. Either way, you apply several thin layers of ink, adding a little here or blotting out a little there, until you like what you have. But it is definitely a process that can be extended to include transfers on a press. :)
 
Jeez Louise this is so gorgeous! This effect makes it both nostalgic and gives me almost a sad feeling (for me)--but I like it! It's something, not exactly sad, but a longing I can't quite explain, which is like a lot of your photography. The feelings they evoke in me. It takes a VERY special photographer to create these kinds of effects. It's masterful Terri! ♥️
 
I love this so much, Terri! Even though I have dabbled in printmaking- this is a whole new level of skill.
Such a beautiful image that you have created. Gorgeous!
 
I love this so much, Terri! Even though I have dabbled in printmaking- this is a whole new level of skill.
Such a beautiful image that you have created. Gorgeous!
Bethany, thank you!

Printmaking is so much fun. I've only done a small amount, but it can be addictive, can't it? :)
 
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