Quick Studies In Oil

Enyaw

namuh
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All painted in the last 6 days .. they are already in the garbage but it you want to point out errors that is fine to do.

These were done on the backs of other pieces I assigned to the garbage bin. These are just studies (already assigned to garbage detail) in order
to find out how to lay down a landscape in a loose manner. I normally like to do a notan on my subject and break it down to 4 or 5 values, paint in the values as a block in and then proceed with putting in color. I was drawing in an outline to keep my perspective where I thought it should be.

In these I did nothing. Pin a white paper to the backpanel on my easle and proceed to paint from the back to the front. It was challanging but with oils I can wipe out or paint over a section quite easily so when I forgot about making my masterpiece I think I greatly improved upon the product at hand. It was a fun exercise and I may move on to a new paper whereby I can keep the piece and call it a painting or do a few more studies. I had forgotten how oily and mismanagable oil paint is when on it's own. My disposition on oil paint.

They are all 11 x 14 oil on paper; alla prima. Brush and Knife. As a side note, on one, I decided to skip my medium of cold wax.​
 
I am attracted to the chunky block-strokes of the top left one- and the menagerie of colours in it on the beach part; as a whole scene, I like the winter one, middle-right, best, although I wish that Payne's gray-ish hue were bluer- blue shadows on snow just look so cold; and out of all of them, I think the bottom-right tree, with its echoed-shape sky holes (or water holes in this case) is Best in Show.

Well done!
 
I’m trying not to be alarmed that these are in the garbage but I understand that they served a purpose for you. Your “no planning” method resulted in some fresh, lively work! I like the way your brush strokes (or knife strokes) suggest fields and foliage rather than describe them in detail. Inspiring work ,Wayne, and I hope you keeping enjoying the journey without worrying about the destination!
 
Thank you JStarr.
I have to agree. When I painted it I wasn't sure I liked it but it grew on me.

Thank you Donna.
Even though I no longer pursue art sales it's still hard to get away from the fears and doubts of not putting out something worth someone buying and that in itself is a barrier. Crazy thoughts that obstruct our letting go and learning by our success or mistakes. I guess it's like stage fright in a way.

Thank you CaliAnn.
 
Awww, some beauties. I love the first one and the fresh look of all of them. The bottom tree is so good but personally I like the "scene". Super duper practice!
 
They each have merit, and I am always in awe of your output. Your approach is admirable: not letting anything become too precious while you study.

Kudos to you!
 
Love the bottom left with the little fence. It's too bad you trash these. But it's your work to do with what you please. ❤️ ;)
 
Ah, the old landscape Wayne is back! Cannot understand the garbage, however. These are hardly garbage and worth keeping.
 
These are all well done Wayne, and much too good for the bin, but I guess that is a moot point now. :sneaky:❤️❤️
 
Thank you Ayin, Bart, Sno, and Zen.
I guess in hindsight I should not have been so cheap and used a new support as some of these came out well enough to keep. Lesson learned. 🤕
 
Ah, the old landscape Wayne is back! Cannot understand the garbage, however. These are hardly garbage and worth keeping.
Thank you Ayin, Bart, Sno, and Zen.
I guess in hindsight I should not have been so cheap and used a new support as some of these came out well enough to keep. Lesson learned. 🤕
Wayne, some of the world's greatest painters reused canvases or painted a new one on the back side. Why not you?
 
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