Etching

Artyczar

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This is an etching I did quite a long time ago. It was done on a copperplate and it was really my first one that I did myself in a tupperwear after reading up on how to do it, what to buy and all that, but I had a Master printer ink the plates and we printed them together as she taught me how to do the rest of the process. I made a couple small runs, one for the pages of an Artist's book (20) and one for a separate edition on larger paper of 13. It's in a two-color, overlapping ink technique called, a la poupée:

patternpiecesetchingdetail.jpg
 

Desforges

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This is an etching I did quite a long time ago. It was done on a copperplate and it was really my first one that I did myself in a tupperwear after reading up on how to do it, what to buy and all that, but I had a Master printer ink the plates and we printed them together as she taught me how to do the rest of the process. I made a couple small runs, one for the pages of an Artist's book (20) and one for a separate edition on larger paper of 13. It's in a two-color, overlapping ink technique called, a la poupée:

View attachment 618
Nice one! And I know that it is you and your dad.
I regret throwing out all those etchings that I did when I studied at an art school some 2o years ago. I had decided to move to the west coast and threw away hundreds of different types of prints. We used plexiglass if I can recall.
 
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This is an etching I did quite a long time ago. It was done on a copperplate and it was really my first one that I did myself in a tupperwear after reading up on how to do it, what to buy and all that, but I had a Master printer ink the plates and we printed them together as she taught me how to do the rest of the process. I made a couple small runs, one for the pages of an Artist's book (20) and one for a separate edition on larger paper of 13. It's in a two-color, overlapping ink technique called, a la poupée:

View attachment 618
One thing I never got into (like I didn't try enough different stuff!) but it just seemed too messy for me to get into. You've done very well with it though. Looks like the two of you are in the process of cutting out the patterns above you. :)
 

Artyczar

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Nice one! And I know that it is you and your dad.
I regret throwing out all those etchings that I did when I studied at an art school some 2o years ago. I had decided to move to the west coast and threw away hundreds of different types of prints. We used plexiglass if I can recall.
Yes, it's me and my dad working when I was a kid and me imagining weird things about the shapes of the patterns.

I have a friend--she is an amazing printmaker and she uses plexi. I have watched her work and it seems like a lot less hassle to use that instead of etching a copperplate. Would it be considered more like a drypoint than an etching in the plexi? I wonder how that works because on an etching, everything but the ground gets burned off in the acid, right? On a drypoint, it's the "burs" that print, but the lines are fuzzier than an etching.

I have a little drypoint of a stove I did for the same book, but I'll have to scan it. The lines are fuzzier, even though I tried to burnish most of the burs.
 

Desforges

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Yes, it's me and my dad working when I was a kid and me imagining weird things about the shapes of the patterns.

I have a friend--she is an amazing printmaker and she uses plexi. I have watched her work and it seems like a lot less hassle to use that instead of etching a copperplate. Would it be considered more like a drypoint than an etching in the plexi? I wonder how that works because on an etching, everything but the ground gets burned off in the acid, right? On a drypoint, it's the "burs" that print, but the lines are fuzzier than an etching.

I have a little drypoint of a stove I did for the same book, but I'll have to scan it. The lines are fuzzier, even though I tried to burnish most of the burs.
You are probably right. I also took 12 credits in Silkscreening which I loved. Now I only paint mainly because I can work anywhere. My space is not very large.
 

xie-kitchin

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Oh wow, it's cool to see someone do something like this just learning from a book and using basic equipment. Though I'm sure having a master printer helped a lot too!

As far as plexiglass, you can use it as a matrix for drypoint, or you could use it for an engraving. The latter doesn't use acid, but a deeper mark engraved into the surface to hold the ink (vs the burr). The lines are crisper, and you don't lose definition as quickly after multiple runs.
 

Artyczar

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I see. Thanks for that clarification xie. I love learning about the process.
 

Trier

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Oh wow, it's cool to see someone do something like this just learning from a book and using basic equipment. Though I'm sure having a master printer helped a lot too!

As far as plexiglass, you can use it as a matrix for drypoint, or you could use it for an engraving. The latter doesn't use acid, but a deeper mark engraved into the surface to hold the ink (vs the burr). The lines are crisper, and you don't lose definition as quickly after multiple runs.
Where is a good place to look up/learn about using the plexiglass on a beginners level. Maybe a utube demo?
Thanks for any info.
Regards,
Trier
 

Artyczar

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For me there were three or four local non-profit community workshops. I found one through word of mouth and the other two through the Internet. Another place, I learned at a night school, but it was just a three day workshop and they let the Master Printer use the press and facilities. It wasn't connected to the school. She just knew the facility. I guess I just started talking to a lot of print makers and I found out a lot out what was going on it the community. You might want to contact whatever community arts center you have around you.
 

WFMartin

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I've done some etching. Not much, but some. Your etching exhibits some of the characteristics that not only adds to the finesse, but also proves that it is a genuine etching. That characteristic is that the flat background still retains a very slight "gray" toning. This is caused by the ink not having been totally removed, when the plate was wiped with the heel of the hand. That toning is considered quite desirable, and is a hallmark of a really genuine etching. The slight indentation around the edge of the subject also indicates that it is a genuine etching, and it is a very desirable characteristic, as well. THIS is the method by which MONEY, and POSTAGE STAMPS is produced. It is difficult to fake, or counterfeit, and is VERY identifiable.

An etching press has a bazillion pounds of pressure per square inch (I exaggerate, of course), in order to get the ink to transfer to the paper from the grooves in which it is placed, so there is a lot of "squeeze" going on in order to create such a nice reproduction as you have here. GOOD ETCHING!
 
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Artyczar

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Thank you so much William. I have done a few more since on different presses.

etchingdetail.jpg


embellishedetching1detail.jpg


This one above had been embellished. The original is below, but not a great shot. It was more of an aquatint.

rollerby3detail.jpg


This is a little drypoint I did for an Artist's book:

121_2140.JPG


I've also done a solar etching. Super easy:

121_2142.JPG


And this one went with the top one.

realfamilyetching (2).jpg
 

stlukesguild

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It's in a two-color, overlapping ink technique called, a la poupée:

Is that the "double drop" method... running the print through twice using two different colors?
 

stlukesguild

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Would it be considered more like a drypoint than an etching in the plexi?

Yes, because you're not actually etching the surface through the use of acid but rather raising a bur by simply scratching the surface. Drypoint is easier than etching, but you get a far smaller number of quality prints... especially with plexi... as a result of running the plate through the pressure of the press.
 

stlukesguild

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One thing I never got into (like I didn't try enough different stuff!) but it just seemed too messy for me to get into.

It's not much messier than painting in oils... but you really need the proper equipment: a press (quite expensive), a ventilated room for the acid bath (different acids for Zinc and Copper plates), ideally a rosin box, etc... Unless you are a full-time print-maker it makes more sense to rent studio time in a professional print studio (or take a class in print at a college). We have a fine print shop near me and I have been friends with a number of the print artists for years, but I really haven't done any intaglio or litho prints since art school. I always loved woodblocks,,, especially in the tradition of the German Expressionists... and the entire process can be done from home with some plywood, good cutting tools, sharpening stone, ink and a baren.
 

stlukesguild

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(Engraving) doesn't use acid, but a deeper mark engraved into the surface to hold the ink (vs the burr). The lines are crisper, and you don't lose definition as quickly after multiple runs.

I made some attempts at engraving in school. It is a bear. While you are essentially drawing with the stylus in etching or drypoint, with engraving you are pushing the tool in a manner not unlike cutting a woodblock (or even linoleum). But much harder. The phenomenal detail and textures that Dürer achieved are mind-blowing:

Durer_-_Knight-Death-and-the-Devil.med.650.jpg
 

Artyczar

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It's in a two-color, overlapping ink technique called, a la poupée:

Is that the "double drop" method... running the print through twice using two different colors?
No, a la poupée is different color inks on the plate. A double drop is two different times through the press. They are both difficult in their own way. If you're running it twice through the press, you need exact registration marks as you would with serigraphs (screenprinting).

Also, you are right in drypoint being easier than etching because it doesn't require acid. It's a lot like engraving (sans the tool points) only there are "burs" which make the engraving marks sort of fuzzy, but you can burnish some of marks down to make them thinner, or thicker, depending on what effect you are going for. I played a lot with this plate for the stove but don't have great images for it.

I have never used plexi. I used nickelplates for the drypoints and copperplates for the etchings. You can't really do much burnishing on plexi as they don't go through the press with an exact impression as many times like a metal plate. It's also harder to file the edges as rounded like you can on the metal plates. You can break them and leave scratch marks you maybe don't want to have, so they are typically very squared.
 
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