lead white with walnut & linseed

Marc

Active member
Messages
194
Earlier in the year I bought some boutique food grade walnut oil with no additives and made a small sample of lead white paint with it. At the same time I also made lead white with cold pressed linseed.
lead-white-1-2.JPG

Here painted on clear plastic and placed over a white acrylic gessoed canvas

The linseed version dried in 3 days. The walnut oil took about two weeks. No driers were added. The pigment was from Maimeri and may no longer be available from them. Both samples are absolutely dry. When wet the linseed paint was very slightly more yellow, but upon both drying, the walnut seemed if anything, seemed more yellow. However after a few months this flipped and the linseed became the yellower and it has remained that way since.

I also tried a 50/50 mix, but this seems to function as a straight linseed. It dried in four days and yellowed like the pure linseed.
lead-white-3.JPG

None of them I think are very yellow over all, they have been in a mostly well lit room, but never in direct sunlight, the colour is about correct on my computer.
 

ntl

Contributing Member
Messages
1,291
Interesting results.
I haven't used WN Cremnetz white (PW1) for a few years, and I think mostly with store walnut oil. Never on plastic. I had no problem with it drying on canvas.
 

Marc

Active member
Messages
194
I wouldn't say it was a problem drying, just slow drying. Different walnut oils have different speeds drying one imagines. I don't know which type of walnut is used in standard oil painting use. I should try the test again with another walnut oil at the same time.

Winsor & newton's old discontinued cremnitz white in safflower* had an added lead dryer. I suppose I could add one too

*Someone years back in email communication with Winsor and Newton said they added just a little linseed though not enough to declare it on the tube. Makes me wonder it they did it with all "safflower" paints perhaps to adjust for seasonal or locational crop differences to the safflower acid ratios.
 

Cremnitz

New member
Messages
10
This looks like a topic made for my user name!

I have been making my own oils for a few years but have never made a lead white. I just scored a pretty big pile of very thin used lead sheets that came from the walls of an X-Ray room that was torn down, and will be trying to make some lead oxide pigment this winter. I have a couple of gallons of cold pressed pure linseed oil as well as the same in walnut oil. It looks like I should try both.
 

ntl

Contributing Member
Messages
1,291
Did you ever get to make your white? No worries, I haven't gotten my oils out for a long time, I was just wondering. :)
 
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